WISH YOU’D BEEN HERE (EVA ROWSON & ANDREA FRANCKE) [on] THE PIZZA

‘The Pizza’ Interview

Wish you’d been here (a collaboration between Eva Rowson and Andrea Francke) is the start of an investigation to bring together and explore histories of and current thoughts on hosting, socializing and partying as a new framework for reflecting on contemporary art practices that involve working with people. Rosalie Schweiker, Mario D’Agostino, Hannah Clayden and Jo Waterhouse are artists based in London. Together they run a monthly dinner called The Pizza.  Both Wish you’d been here and The Pizza are based in London, UK.

 At Our Shop {Wednesday 16 July 2014}

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Do you do something special with your mushrooms before you put them on the pizza?

It’s not about the food.

We put stuff on there that we really shouldn’t have put on there – like the broccoli.

They’ve changed a lot. Now they’re thin and crispy.

I think it has to be a bit more effort than you would do yourself. It’s in the details.

I just want to feel like I’m on a cruise for once in my life.

How did it start? I had the idea in the shower and emailed you guys and you said yes. Then Jo got pulled in later on – because you live with me! We do all bring something different and special to the night. Rosalie does the placemats, Mario does the pizza, Jo brings the table, Hannah drinks a lot.

You invite someone because you really like what they do and not because you are expecting something back.

Friend-networking. If we had enough money we would buy their work, but as we don’t we invite them and cook them a pizza to thank them for making their work.

Sometimes you like someone’s work and they turn out to be an arsehole, but that hasn’t happened to us yet.

We’ve never been stood-up.

El’s pizza was so busy – it was nuts.

The idea started with how to find a way to meet people.

Petrol can of wine.

Pizza_broccoli

Courtesy of The Pizza.

Guests can bring friends so they feel more comfortable. We put it on Facebook and really rarely someone we don’t know comes. Then it’s friends of friends. We can’t really do more than 10-15 people, can’t really afford to feed more than that and don’t want to be stressed out by it.

You could make it bigger and charge people, but there’s something nice about not having to charge people. We’ve invited people to come so it seems odd to then charge them. Really, it’s good it’s happening in our living room, and people have to leave their coats in my bedroom  – there’s no escape, which is one of the nice things. It changes the dynamic having it in the flat, it’s such a personal thing.

Worst pizza was wheat free, cold.

We’ve never sat down and thought about why and how we do it.

We make it so the artist isn’t on display or having to answer questions about themselves, sometimes you don’t even know who the artist is.

We hardly ever talk about art.

Sometimes there’s an element of fandom and nervousness beforehand.

But there is always one of us that will go: So what do you do?

A strategy for successful stalking. “Hi, I followed you home and would you like some pizza?”

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Every time we try to make a calendar we fail.

You just have to brave enough to knock on the door.

If no one comes do you think of it as failure? It doesn’t have to be about how many people come.

Sometimes people come up to me and say ‘oh I think I’ve met you, I’ve been in your living room’.

It’s anti socially engaged.

If you call it art does it change it?

I wouldn’t wanna do it for an institution as I do my art projects. I wanna do it for myself.

It feels odd to invite people round for dinner and then tell them it’s an artwork.

I would be careful to label any social occasion as an art project.

I would describe myself as an artist and if someone asks me what I do I would take about the pizza to describe my practice, but I’m not sure if I think of the pizza as an artwork in itself.

I use the pizza as an example of how to expand your social group and meet people.

This is going to make my life better so I’m going to do it.

Pizza_diagram

Courtesy of The Pizza

Re-enactment. Artists have hosted dinners and made restaurants. There is value in seeing the small things and the differences each time you do it.

We wouldn’t claim it’s a revolution in art practice.

It’s like when you make something for one person.

It’s a bit like throwing someone a birthday party.

Between the 4 of us there is not a definition of what it is.

Sharing food is quite an intimate thing.

If you do something for a long time it gives people time to realise what it means to you.

They can decide the toppings.

Pizza_face

Courtesy of The Pizza

It’s like inventing our own folk art traditions. It’s just stuff that you just do. We are from a certain kind of tribe and this is our folk art.

I don’t think folk art wants to be in the art world. You do something and you’re so into it but it doesn’t fit in with an art tradition, it has its own logic. It can just exist and it has its own followers without the art world.

I can only host my own dos, I can’t host anybody else’s as then I become a guest. It’s a weird thing to be invited to be a host.

It’s not about making a pizza, it’s about being together.

I’m genuinely not into pizza.

Pizza_image1

Courtesy of The Pizza

 ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

Further information on ANDREA FRANCKE & EVA ROWSON’s project Wish You’d Been Here can be found by clicking their names or the project title.

Rosalie SchweikerMario D’AgostinoHannah Clayden and Jo Waterhouse are artists based in London. Together they run a monthly dinner called The Pizza.

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